Feedback, Reviews, and Testimonials –

Welcome!

Since you got to this page, you are probably hoping to find out more about other’s experiences with these rehabilitation programs. I have three different areas of feedback for you to discover. Click on the bold purple headers below and that will take you to that page of feedback.

Q&A Category –

You probably have this category figured out!

cat with inquisitive look about feedback reviews animal rehabilitation

It’s a collection of posts made from questions people have asked of me and my answers to them at the time. I have taken time to edit a few answers if my perspective has changed over time or if I think I need to make the information more clear.

I’ve got hundreds more questions on file that I have answered that I might get to make into posts, so stay tuned! Probably easier if you subscribe to this website. If you do, then you’ll receive email notice when I make new posts.

Reviews –

This page directs you to both veterinarian reviews and client reviews of my booklets and programs. I have copied most of the reviews from other business places on the web, such as Amazon. I really need and want to edit my booklets to add more info and photos and such, so, stay tuned, again.

In some cases, veterinarians wrote emails to me when they read my booklet(s) for the first time, and I copied some of the mail into posts for you to read as reviews.

Testimonials –

This  section has posts I made out of people’s feedback about the programs after they worked on rehab as I directed. In these posts clients tell how this rehab worked for their pet(s).

Social Media –

I completely deleted all of my Facebook pages and profiles in November, 2016, but I did save my files. I also deleted Twitter at the same time, but I have since begun a new Twit account. Once in a while I make a post based on feedback I received on Facebook or my old Twitter. The Twit changed in the time I was off of it, and I don’t have the same engagement type as I used to have, so there’s not a lot on there as of May, 2018. Feel free to engage me on the Twit.

Anyway, you get the idea. My other sm accounts are represented by words or badges in the sidebar or footer of this site. I aim for reciprocal connections.

I am my own social media person, and that takes a backseat to seeing patients, communicating with clients, and improving this website. There is already plenty of feedback for you to read on here, though, so I hope I’ve hit your topic of concern in these web pages.

Want to Comment?

I turned off comments on this site for a long time because I couldn’t keep up with answering people’s questions in what I thought was a timely manner. One of my former WordPress themes even stopped telling me I had comments when people posted them on the site.  I have been on the road a lot and was not able to check the site very often. Sometimes people’s questions went unanswered. Not good, imho.

I have comments after most posts turned on now. If you have feedback about this program or a post, you may write that as a comment or contact me with questions using the form on this page.

I have also been working hard on upgrading this site for you. I turned comments on again because I have easily covered info about the most frequent pet rehab questions searched on the web and on this site. I’m hoping people will read and search the site for the basics before asking me in a comment or contact form 🙂

I’m Desperate!

Please be aware that if you have a pet emergency, you really need to contact your veterinarian, a veterinary emergency clinic, or a 2nd opinion veterinarian if need be. 

Also, sometimes people do not think they are getting answers they need or want from their veterinarian. I do a lot of patient advocacy and navigation in human medicine and veterinary medicine, and I am a big fan of getting a 2nd (or 3rd or +) opinion on some issues.

People ask very many questions of me in comments and via contact forms about topics I have already covered on this site. Please search and read a lot of the info on this site so that you hopefully have your questions answered more quickly than you will waiting for me.

AND, if you read my basic post-injury or post-surgery information, you will know more details that will save you time if we later get together about your pet!

I am open to working with clients in paid consults from all around the world. I work in person and via phone for consults at this time.  You may find out more about my practice by looking at the info on the pages in the first drop-down menu under my main site banner.

Happy Reading, and Happy May Day –

Deborah

First Published March 9, 2017. Updated May 1, 2018

Successful Rehab of Colorado Hiking Dog with Torn Knee Ligament & No Surgery

Hi!
Hope all is well with you. Thanks for keeping me in your circle for emails!
You should feel free to tell or post on social media anything about the rehab of Sputnik.
He’s doing amazing.
When we moved out here (Manitou Springs, CO), he got a little re-injured. Our yard is built into a hill and he tried to jump a retaining wall to catch a squirrel. I’ve learned that he needs more restriction and leash time here – given it’s so hilly and he’s so prey driven. It was very minor and I  used all your techniques, books and notes to help with it. I”m grateful we kept notes!
And…the thing that makes me happiest in the whole world…he LOVES to hike and be outside on trails. It melts my heart to know how happy he is and how much he just loves to have walks and exercise. I can’t believe he’s 11 years young. You’d never know it by looking at him and if you didn’t have his protective mom telling him he’s been injured, no one would ever know. I promise because it’s happened time and time again that people say “really?” when I mention it!
I also thought it might be a good idea to see if there was a specialist here given I don’t know the terrain as well yet. I was curious to know about whether hiking was good for him.
Turns out that YOU got lots of kudos from our orthopedic (specialist) doctor,  she said I did everything right.
And she said given how well he’s doing, she thought we made the right decision for Sputnik
by not having surgery.
I can’t tell you how this eased my mind given surgeons just want to tell you to always have surgery.
I am forever indebted to you and all your help.
I know I get some credit for sticking to a plan. (Yes, YOU do, Renee!-Rehabdeb)
That’s huge. But you were my teacher and that is the important thing! Thank you!
Sputnik is doing great.
He’s hiking up to 4-5 miles a time – many days a week (with rest periods too. I know he’s not a young pup anymore and he gets days off!). Walking some pretty hefty hills and is happy, happy, happy.
Thank you!
Happy Holidays!
~ Renee
12/15/16
Sputnik now sees vets at Mountain Shadows Pet Hospital and recently received praise on his non-surgical CCR recovery from an orthopedic surgeon at Colorado Canine Orthopedics

Elderly Sheepdog With Neurological Problems – Homework Review

Here is the short write-up of my recommendations/reminders for Abby’s functional rehab and the process I believe will improve her neuro-muscular capabilities and strength.

To Abby’s Caretakers:

Some of this will be stuff I’ve mentioned several times over the course of working with Abby, however it bears review, and most of the time, when I re-evaluate a program, often we need to go back closer to a beginning point and press forward methodically in order to achieve expected gains. As always, I am available to do this work and especially if you need assistance because it is hard on your own body or even just to make sure it gets done so that Abby may recover well! 🙂

I can’t emphasize enough how beneficial the vibrational massage is, even if you do it every other day instead of every day for now. For a refresher, please watch the 10 minute video here:

http://wp.me/p1wSDA-kp

And do it as best possible without cutting corners. You will get the best outcome if you follow the video instructions, and I’d really like it done daily to better encourage healing on several levels. Pertinent questions are also covered in the video, as well as methodology and benefits. Make sure you change out the batteries as soon as they seem dull, because the best benefit from this massage is realized from the vibration, which stimulates circulation, lessens tension, and potentially improves nerve conduction. I recommend, for now, doing the massage at the end of the day, at bedtime or thereabouts.

For the next week, please walk Abby twice daily, super slowly and consistently, without stopping, for 15 minutes. I chose 15 minutes because you said she has already accomplished doing 10 min walks for a week, 3-4 times per day. Before that, she laid a foundation with 3-4 five minute walks daily for a week. There are very many reasons why I use this method, and they all contribute to the gains we are trying to achieve. Super slow walking encourages use of all limbs to the best of their ability. Abby has already been able to walk multiple times daily, super slowly, for five and ten minute sessions, having built up slowly. Using the same exercise protocol for a week allows more time for the body to adjust to the work load, and it should go well, because these are introductory workouts, to build a base.

For the week following the twice daily 15 min walks, please walk her 2×20 minutes in the same manner, and only if the 15 minute walks are completed well for a week. She should be able to complete these walks without dragging a hind limb and without sagging or falling down. That’s because we spent time building the base. Otherwise, she needs to return to 10 minute walks and do them multiple times daily to ensure success. I am not wanting complete fatigue and maxing ability at this point; I am after building successful progress, which I believe her body will adapt to and accomplish.

I really would like her to wear two supportive hard braces during these walks, and I realize you have only one. She hyper-extends both her tarsal joints, and in order to use her hind legs properly and to subsequently use the muscles better/properly, the supportive brace that prevents hyper-extension while she is doing her slow drills would be additionally beneficial. Use the one you have on her R hind, since that leg has the most deficits and is the weakest. She hyper-extends because of nerve weakness and deficits in this case, and that has been a problem since I began giving you instruction for her over a year ago.

After the week of 2×20 min slow, relatively flat walks, please add in cavalettis, obstacles, to improve her proprioception. This may be accomplished in many ways and several locations around your environment. I have photos on my Facebook rehab page that depict several home-based cavaletti designs. Please be sure to read the descriptions below the pictures, because not every type of cavaletti is for every pet 🙂

Abby needs to do the cavalettis every other day and during one of the walk workout times. You should warm her up walking for 5 minutes then do obstacle repeats for 10-15 minutes. I suggest you use about 5 items in a row, spaced about half an Abby-length apart, and between 4-6 inches high for now. If we could get the old cat to do the work, I’m pretty sure we can get Abby to do it! If she is too stubborn for you, I will be glad to take a rehab session and work with you and her on this drill.

After a week of this drill, keep doing it as prescribed, and add in hill repeats every third day as one of her twice-daily workouts. I suggest walking out the front door, around to the back yard, and then up and down the hill on the far side of the house for 10-15 minutes, very slowly. I was able to get her to do this work this past summer when I came for rehab checks.

During the hill phase, it may be more beneficial for Abby to receive laser therapy on the hill work days. This should have the effect of stimulating nerves and cellular process and often improves work ability in the older and neuro-challenged animals. In her condition, I see reason to have twice-weekly laser sessions for at least a month-I’ve had good outcomes from doing this with similar cases.

I think it would be great if you were able to just start where I suggest, as if we were beginning from scratch, and let’s see the progress that comes from scripted protocol and collaborative effort. She won’t improve from this point if she keeps doing the same walks and leads the same life she has been leading for the past many months…the body stagnates, and the same happens for humans as well. Our brains aim toward conservation while our bodies are able to do more. I believe, based on my experience that is also based on years of research, that we will see strength and muscle gains if you start here again. I suggest we review in one month after these exercises have been completed. I will then revise the protocol and change the challenges.

Thanks!

Blessings-

Deborah January, 2013

Kacey Cat Does Cavaletti Work

http://youtu.be/IqwFemytxzs       (CLICK HERE)

Kacey has neurological problems in her hind end. I have been performing laser therapy on her and working on finding exercises that will benefit her quality of life. The owner and I discovered during one visit that she would walk one direction across a particular section of bar top to get to some place her kitty brain holds special…so special that she will repeat this action many times.

I placed 5-6 remotes across the bar top, and Kacey is to make 5-6 passes over all of them, every other day, doing it all at one time.

She has improved much around the home, and we made some other exercises work for her too.

She is working on losing some of her “extra”.

Click on the link above to view the video.

Cavalettis

Tiny the Broken Back Kitty

Tiny’s Transitional Mobility Mover-First Few Days

I built this for Tiny while I was doing rehab for her broken back. She has a standard cart, but a cart is a poor choice for Tiny and for her situation. This video is one of her first times in the Mover.

Tiny Improves in Mobility Mover

After working on a few drills a day in her Mover, Tiny ambles down her hallway during week 2 of Mover Mobility 🙂 Drills I prescribed were specific to her neuro capabilities as demonstrated by action and not solely reliant upon diagnostic statements with the exception that I am always attentive to pain signs and diagnostics as relates to damage or injury that I consider when creating exercise protocol.

Tiny Walks – Broken Back Kitty

This is Tiny Kyle, the kitty with the broken back that I featured a couple of weeks ago in the mobility station I built specific to her needs. This is the most movement she has achieved since the accident over a year ago, and this is substantial, to say the least! We are all pretty excited