Pet Injury – 3 Steps

Pepper, a medium-sized black dog doing rehabilitation walks after rupturing her calcanean or Achilles tendon
Pepper Ruptured Calcanean Tendon

 Pet Injury Follow Steps –

Short notes with instructions for you to follow after your dog has been injured. I do also work on lots of cats as well as a variety of other animals. If you want to know more about cat specifics right now (because I haven’t finished developing the cat pages), please search for cat in the search box 🙂

These recommendations also work if your pet isn’t moving as well as they used to because of arthritis or advanced age, for instance, and you would like to help them.

Please have your pet evaluated by a veterinarian if you have not already, so that we may all work to be on the right track for your pet’s recovery. It is very likely that your veterinarian does not know about this style of rehabilitation, because it is home-based, so feel free to share this site with them. I am available to discuss with your vet and provide teaching seminars for clinics, too!

For more specific info on a particular injury or diagnosis, please see the menu at the top bar or use the search box on this site. For more info on why I don’t have ever injury and recovery ever posted on my site yet, see this page or this page 🙂

1) Get the right book with a successful plan for you to use at home

Books:

Most pet (and often human) orthopedic and soft tissue injuries may be recovered without surgery when there are no broken bones, and some injuries with broken bones recover well without surgery, too! Your veterinarian should be able to help you decide if surgery is necessary for your pet’s broken bones. More on this later-

The information in this booklet my booklet with 4 weeks of foundational recovery instructions also contains a GREAT foundation-building, functional recovery base for older pets that have lost muscle mass & strength and have lost some proprioceptive abilities, lost the ability to maintain balance and know where they are physically in relation to their environment. The 4-week foundational program in the bookmy booklet with 4 weeks of foundational recovery instructions is often what is needed to help older dogs that are slipping on the floor or having trouble rising or are tripping over the doggie door threshold.

More strengthening and drills should be added after this program. A full 12-week, progressively difficult, program designed by me or a practitioner with a lot of experience and training in exercise physiology program design and functional recovery is what I’m about! For most people and pets, even a little bit of improvement makes everyone happy and makes a big difference in quality of life.

You have to start with a specific foundationmy booklet with 4 weeks of foundational recovery instructions, though, at the beginning, to make sure your pet has a solid foundation to help offset additional injury.

Please also pay attention to the discharge instructions your veterinarian has given you if your pet just had surgery or you have received instruction regarding your pet’s injury.  Please pay special attention to the part about no running, jumping, or playing. If you follow my booklet instructions, you and your pet will be doing work appropriate to recovery and should not be causing any harm. Still, no running or jumping or playing! You may, however, incorporate the directions I give to you for allowable activity. Otherwise, your injured pet should be restricted!

Right now I only have one book published with information about helping your pet build a foundational base through four progressive weeks of work after injury. This is the book, then, to get you started and the one to order if your pet has lost any degree of function, especially in their hind end.

This book is specifically addressing torn knee ligaments, yet until I am able to publish the books I am working on that deal with hip issues, other knee issues, elbows, old age/arthritis, and spinal issues, the book below will be helpful to you for those situations, too. This book contains the restrictions and advice I would give to get you started after almost any orthopedic injury or diminished functional condition.

Note that your pet’s veterinarian really needs to evaluate most injuries sooner than later, even if you think you know exactly what the problem is. Unless you have a full range of personal experience with diagnostic knowledge and an x-ray machine, you might miss something very important! And even veterinarians can run into orthopedic or neurological problems they aren’t sure how to treat, so joining with a specialist like me builds your pet’s recovery team!

Please do not involve additional work until you have passed the 4-week foundation with gold stars! Please follow all the instructions for the best outcome 🙂 Please do not (again, I say it, because you’d be surprised at how many people think adding other work to this intro recovery system is a great idea) don’t add swimming (no swimming yet), stairs (no stairs yet), hill repeats (no hill repeats yet), poles (no poles yet), cavalettis (no cavalettis yet), or other dynamic activity.

Your pet may seem to be doing great and may seem to you like she/he is healed, especially if they have good pain medication, but I can assure you that biologically the minimum amount of time for soft tissue recovery is on average 8-12 weeks. Some situations take up to a year to heal well (nerve damage, torn muscles, etc…), so please don’t be fooled by appearances or by programs that don’t understand biological recovery science. Best way I know to say it ^^ and I’ve seen complications from hundreds of cases where a proper foundation wasn’t followed 🙂

Being able to walk a mile or around the block a day doesn’t matter if your pet has function problems elsewhere in their life, so get this info, follow it, and establish a solid base. If your pet can walk a mile but can’t get up off the floor, this plan is for them. The book explains more about this approach.

After the base is built, then always there are additional strengthening and proprioceptive drills to be done in order to return your pet to a better quality of movement and lifestyle!

Conservative treatment after torn knee ligament, instead of surgery:

my booklet with 4 week base-building recovery plan
Amazon for USA, CA, DE, ES, FR, IT, & UKlinks to buy the booklet in different countries, including the USA
Amazon in other countries
Books are also available on Barnes and Noble and you should be able to order from any bookseller (available on Kindle and in paperback).

Also, if the injury you are concerned about is a torn knee ligament in your dog, then please click here to read more info (then return to the instructions on this page!).

2) In addition to thoroughly reading any of that ^^ info, please watch > this video < twice, and begin to do this massage daily for a month.

Please watch the video to see my recommendations on method of use for massager unit AND so you will hopefully have success introducing the buzzy massager.

There are also written instructions under the video on the linked page.

Here is what the massager looks like, and if you click on the picture, you may buy it on Amazon if you choose:

Homedics brand battery powered massager with 4 feet

there is additional information about where you might purchase this particular massager in the written instructions under the video. I am often asked if this massager or that massager will work, and the answer is, “no, not as well”. There are “we love science” reasons for my choice.

3) If your pet is still limping 5-7 days or more after surgery, please read this > pain post < all the way through!

There is more on the topic of pain within the books-

Check out other resources under the “Rehab Resources & Tools” link in the menu under the website title at the top or by clicking here

Blessings-
Rehabdeb

 

(Updated January 25, 2018. First posted on this new site April, 2015)

How Do I Find Help for My Pet on This Site?

How do I find rehabilitation help for my pet on this site?

There is a lot of information on this site!

I have posted a lot of information on this site. You should find directions that are very helpful to you and your pet’s situation (unless a post is under construction).

  • In the menu section you should see a few question-based topics. If you see what you want, click on the topic.
  • There are detailed choices under each topic. You should see cascading menus with many choices.
  • If you don’t want to read all the available choices (I’ve tried to condense them), then just skip to the search box and try searching a couple of your ideas.
cat with neurological problems in a harness and cart I built to help teach her to walk again
Tiny the Cat in Her Mobility Mover

More Tools-

I have also made posts for you to see some of the products I use to work on healing and recovery with your pet. I will be adding to the helpful tools section as time allows and when I find products that truly work in the field.

A lot of tools and ideas marketed to people for pet rehabilitation are a waste of time and money. I want to help you to streamline your rehab work and use tools that really work to help your pet!

Check out the list of the top five posts people read on this site. This list is to the right of posts on the a big screen and at the very bottom of the page on phones or tablets.

I will be adding to the choices of conditions on my injury and surgery pages. I have explained more on those pages about how to use the rehab steps to help you with your pets orthopedic or neurological problem diagnosis.

Saint Bernard in a cart to help support her while she walks

The Website and My Work-

I write all of my own posts, design all rehab programs for clients, perform most of the IT work on this site, oversee IT messes & posts on all my other social media, manage client communications, and perform *all* the other work associated with running a business. It’s very time-consuming, as you may know, and I don’t have administrative help/support.

For about nine years I saw many clients in person daily as I could. Once in a while I would post on this site a long answer to questions about rehab situations. I really didn’t have time to roll with all the tech changes that have happened until I reduced the number of clients I saw in person. Now I’m working on streamlining this site as fast as I am able 🙂 Thanks for your patience!

Rehabdeb

Updated February 12, 2018

Supplements to Help Cat and Dog Painful Joints

For a Cat or Dog Painful Joints:

I prefer supplements and vitamins that have the least amount of added flavoring, coloring, and other additives that aren’t specific for healing. Below are a few brands I have chosen to help a cat or dog with painful joints. Each product links to Amazon, but you may buy them anywhere you like, of course. This page is specifically for links to products I recommend and have received feedback of positive results. You may find more info about each product by clicking on the photo link. I also have some information about the use of these supplements  in other posts on this website or in my books.

       For Cats:

Bottle of Nutramax brand Cosequin capsules for cat painful joints that links to Amazon for purchasebottle of Duralactin Feline immuno-nutritional aid for managing inflammatory conditions in cats and cat painful joints that links to Amazon for purchase

Duralactin Feline is an immuno-nutritional aid for managing inflammatory conditions, such as soft tissue injury or arthritis in cats. Managing cat arthritis symptoms with Duralactin Feline can be especially beneficial in many ways. Duralactin Feline is affordable and can be used as a long-term solution in conjunction with other medications and treatments. Duralactin Feline is a dried milk protein concentrate derived from hyper-immunized cows. It is a non-prescription supplement that is available in liquid or capsule form. Duralactin Feline can be administered directly, with or without food. The main ingredients are MicroLactin, a dried milk protein and omega fatty acids.

     For Dogs:

bottle of Nutramax brand Cosequin DS capsules for dog or cat with painful joints that links to Amazon for purchase

     For People or Dogs:

If you are taking a proven, high-quality glucosamine & chondroitin (sometimes with more ingredients) supplement, then you may usually share it with your dog. Check the labels on one of the products I have listed here in order to find out dosing suggestions for your dog. Then you may compare the pet dosing to the info on your own supplement. Try to get close to the same amount the veterinary version suggests. In this case it’s better that you give a little bit more rather than a lot less than the recommended amount.

bottle of Nutramax brand Cosamin Joint Health Capsules that may be used for human cat or dog painful joints that links to Amazon for purchase

Check the ingredients of yours to make sure there isn’t a sweetener in it. Don’t give xylitol to your pets. I don’t like to give any formulas that contain aspartame or sucralose, either. That cuts out many of the flavored dog versions.

Help Giving Pet Medication – Hiding Pills in Healthy Foods!

These products are for both cats and dogs 🙂

Do you need help giving pet medications?

These options are like “Trick or Treat!?”… and it’s both!

I prefer this type of pocket to give pills if your pet won’t take the pills easily. “Easily” might be putting the pill in a small wrapper of grass-fed butter (try to not use standard butter) and watching them gulp it.

This brand of pocket is just the meat. It does not contain added flavors, sugar, grains, chemicals, or other ingredients that work against overall health.

These are duck hearts, freeze-dried: bag of freeze-dried duck hearts for treats or tasty help giving pet medications

…and these are awesome for giving stinky pills.

Tramadol is bitter, Gabapentin is bitter if the capsule breaks open, and antibiotics taste and smell nasty! Please don’t just throw most pills into your pet’s food. I often have to help pets who have stopped eating because of medications in the food. I cover more info on this in my books.

Here are a few more flavors and types of pockets I like that may help you with pill dosing:

This one is turkey: bag of turkey heart nuggets for treats or tasty help giving pet medications

Another option that works for a lot of pets is to use a canned food in small amounts.

You should give the canned-foodball-pill-treats only after a meal if you are giving an anti-inflammatory or an antibiotic. Do not give canned foodballs with pills instead of a meal if you are giving anti-inflammatories or antibiotics or other medications that need a meal to go with them. Give a regular meal first, and then give the pill-treats.

I like a lot of different brands and a couple of types of food for pets. A lot of people from around the world read this website, and I don’t pretend to know what foods are available in every market. In the Austin, TX area, where I’ve lived for many years, we have a huge selection of food choices available. Other posts on this site talk about food and feeding. This post is about healthy options to help with pill dosing for your pet. For the purposes of this post, I’ll give you a link to two canned foods that may help with pill dosing. 

I recommend completely grain-free foods with other ingredients sourced as cleanly as you are able to get.

Cat food works for both cats and dogs, and I recommend it for dog pill dosing if you cannot get them to take the pills in a canned dog food ball: can of Nulo brand grain free cat food you may use for cats or dogs for tasty help giving pet medications

…and a dog version (not for cats) (it won’t kill them, it’s just not high enough in protein for them, in general to use as a regular food): can of nulo grain free dog food you may use for tasty help giving pet medications

There are many flavors available, so snoop around once you get to the site, if you want.

Some other tricks that don’t mess up your pet’s stomach and are better quality choices:

Cut a small sliver of grass-fed butter and “taco-burrito” the pill in the little roll of butter. <<That link goes to one of my personal favorites, however there are other choices for grass-fed butter. Read labels, figure out labeling tricks, and look for quality options. The butter option is super simple, so I hope it works for you!

Sometimes I meet a pet that will take pills in a small chunk of hot dog. I recommend beef that hasn’t been fed grains or trapped in a feedlot. Austin gives me a lot of choices for grass-fed meats, however I also travel a lot and see fewer choices in many cities. We can get super creative sometimes and stay with healthy choices. I don’t find a link on Amazon to a grass-fed, “clean” beef hot dog of the quality I prefer, so here’s a link to a brand that’s readily available and has less junk ingredients than most other choices.

It’s not the end of the world if you give a lesser-quality food product to your pet. I just find that one allowance leads to another then another, etc…and I have spent lots of time with clients reversing their pet’s allergies and inflammation using better or higher-quality nutrition. I will save more food information for another post. Nonetheless, I’ve given you a little insight into why I recommend the choices for help giving pet medications that I’ve recommended.

Blessings-

Rehabdeb Deborah

 

Updated 1/16/18

Client Comments and Reviews

A few client comments and reviews from the web to get you started! See some individual testimonials here.

“Scientific”
“I’ve known Deborah Carroll for several years and she has worked with us rehabbing our 90lb Hound/Lab mix. I have always found her to be chock full of great scientific information in rehabbing your pet, and the booklet simplifies all that into simple to understand protocol and reasons to follow the protocol to help your dog. Short read but well worth it. I love it!”
D.B., Amazon Review

“Good Advice”
This book is very easy to read, with good advice for pet parents after a cruciate repair surgery. Compliance is a major cause for surgery failure. In a humorous way, the book gives good guidance on what NOT to do as well as a guideline for healing after surgery. I have recommended this book to several clients already and I wish I had the book last year after my dog, Rufus had his TPLO.
Thank you for the new resource,
Melanie Fox Vanicek, DVM
, Amazon Review

“Effective”
“Deborah Carroll provides effective exercises for physical therapy that are non-invasive and can be done at home with successful outcomes.

This is a great introduction book that explains the physical therapy instead of surgery route and what it means for you and your pet. These guidelines and exercises are a way of treating a torn ligament that works as long as you and your pet are ready to take the time to achieve results.

Surgery is not always inevitable and Deborah Carroll provides an alternative. My dog has followed these guidelines and has had great results. At the time of her injury she could not walk on her back leg (torn ACL, meniscus).

Through working with the support of our veterinarian for pain management, the physical therapy and suggested diet changes, she not only walks on all her legs again, she can go for long walks, climb hills and stairs and pull me down the sidewalk. We are proof that you can successfully rehab your pet at home without the trauma and recovery of surgery.”
Katie, Amazon Review

Easy Plan
“The book easily outlines a plan to rehabilitate your dog from a knee injury. I now feel like there is hope for his long term recovery. Thanks Deb!”
Amazon Review

“Completely Rehabilitate”
“Using the methods described in this book, we were able to completely rehabilitate our Labrador Retriever from a torn ACL without having surgery. Very thankful that this book was so easily accessible!”
H.P., Amazon Review

No Surgery
“I chose not to have my 9 year old Lab put through the stress of surgery on his torn CCL – knowing that he is already showing signs of the other leg being injured. After much research, I found Deborah’s website and read a lot of the blog posts where I learned of her book. I have been using the therapy in the book now for about a month and it is working well in conjunction with some holistic remedies and massage, Since the process of healing is really the same for both non-surgery and surgery dogs, this book will help either way! Easy to follow, but you do have to stick with it to see results.”
Amazon Review

“Expertise”
“I have worked in a variety of animal care fields – as a veterinary technician, pet sitter, and behavior consultant – since 1997, and have several mutual clients with the author. As such, I have seen first-hand what she can do for both her clients and patients. Her knowledge, skill, and bedside manner are impeccable, to the point that she has become the only person that I refer people to for small animal rehabilitation in the Austin area. I am so glad that she has written this book, so that people who live outside the Austin area can benefit from her expertise. I highly recommend it!”
Emily S., Amazon Review, From Beaks to Barks

“Practical”
“This was an easy to read and understand guidebook. There were lots of practical tips offered. Her program is something I can follow on a day to day basis. The author has obviously had lots of experience with dog rehabilitation and wants the best for our dogs.”
Lori L., Amazon Review

“Love”
“I love Deborah Carroll and her approaches to rehab/conditioning- we see her next week.”
Courtney K, Austin, TX Courtney’s Agility Page

 

Add your client comments and reviews in a comment, below, and I may add it to the site. If you have a pet-oriented business and you have used my program(s), please include the link to your business when you write your comment! Thanks!

Updated February 10, 2018