How You May Help Rescue Organizations and Animal Shelters with Rehab!!

This is an exciting opportunity to help animal shelter and rescue rehabilitation to save money and pets!!

Dog in Blinds

This is a great way for you to get involved in rescue rehabilitation and rehab for animal shelters in the USA right now (and maybe around the globe later)!

WHAT?

If you read  >>> the reviews <<< on this site, you will see that several veterinarians and others have mentioned that this book ∨∨∨

should be available to more shelters and rescues for new caretakers of adopted pets, and we’d like to offset the expense to shelters of handing out these books to new pet adopters. (Note: if you have blocked Amazon, the book link will not show up above. If you are interested in searching for it on your own, you may use the ISBN 9780615900476 for more info.)

To donate to this program through me, you must use the PayPal link below for the discounted price. Otherwise, if you just want to purchase some and hand them out or use for yourself, then use the Amazon link, above ∧ ∧ by clicking the pic of the book.

HOW?

There is a drop-down menu associated with this PayPal button ∨ ∨ so that you may choose your donation amount…
check it out-


After Torn Knee Ligament Recovery Book
Message From You to Recipients



(This is a secure site & so is PayPal, just fyi)

WHY?

People want the book for dogs in rescue organizations and dogs in animal shelters so that the inexpensive and less-traumatic recovery options offered in the book may be followed instead of immediately pursuing surgery for torn knee ligaments.

IMPACTFUL CONSERVATION…

The other exciting part of this equation is that by following the rehab protocol outlined in the book, instead of first going to surgery, more funds could be made available for other newly admitted pets with much bigger medical problems! This is a very exciting effort toward overall conservation and community wellness.

MORE DEETS-

I am currently editing these original 4-week, foundation-building rehab books, and in the meantime, for every $5 donated, I am able to give one of these original books to an established city/county shelter or verified rescue organization in the contiguous United States.

These books will accompany new pet caretakers at adoption, and the new adoptors will be able to follow the directions while working with their veterinarian on follow-up for pain control, continued recovery, and additional wellness.

SO MUCH NEEDED HELP, IN MANY WAYS (AND THANK YOU ALL)!

I will be posting pics below this post as books are donated so that you will be able to see the benefits of your donations. I will also post pics and follow-up info from the new pet parents too, when they share it with me!

Thank you in advance for participating in this adventure!

Blessings-

Deborah

Q & A

May we buy books from you at this same discount for our clinic, to hand out to clients?

If you are a clinic owner or associate, you may also use this option to purchase books for your clinic. Many of you are already doing this though personal contact with me. If you have not previously ordered from me, be sure to include your clinic name and shipping information in the comments section of the Paypal purchase. Also, to make sure the info gets sent to me, fill out the short private contact form below.

When will this option be available for clinics and shelters in other areas besides the United States?

On the one hand, I could implement this option at any time. On the other hand, I’d need to first know shipping destination outside of the US. Then I would know how many books I could send for a particular donation amount. Currency exchange rates are a factor. Please contact me using the form below, and we will work out the details via email. Please include your clinic or shelter email where the contact box asks for it.  You may provide your personal email if you are a principle veterinarian at the facility. The info you put into the contact box goes directly to  my email, so no one else should see your information.

Elderly Sheepdog With Neurological Problems – Homework Review

Here is the short write-up of my recommendations/reminders for Abby’s functional rehab and the process I believe will improve her neuro-muscular capabilities and strength.

To Abby’s Caretakers:

Some of this will be stuff I’ve mentioned several times over the course of working with Abby, however it bears review, and most of the time, when I re-evaluate a program, often we need to go back closer to a beginning point and press forward methodically in order to achieve expected gains. As always, I am available to do this work and especially if you need assistance because it is hard on your own body or even just to make sure it gets done so that Abby may recover well! 🙂

I can’t emphasize enough how beneficial the vibrational massage is, even if you do it every other day instead of every day for now. For a refresher, please watch the 10 minute video here:

https://rehabdeb.com/pet-massage/

And do it as best possible without cutting corners. You will get the best outcome if you follow the video instructions, and I’d really like it done daily to better encourage healing on several levels. Pertinent questions are also covered in the video, as well as methodology and benefits. Make sure you change out the batteries as soon as they seem dull, because the best benefit from this massage is realized from the vibration, which stimulates circulation, lessens tension, and potentially improves nerve conduction. I recommend, for now, doing the massage at the end of the day, at bedtime or thereabouts.

For the next week, please walk Abby twice daily, super slowly and consistently, without stopping, for 15 minutes. I chose 15 minutes because you said she has already accomplished doing 10 min walks for a week, 3-4 times per day. Before that, she laid a foundation with 3-4 five minute walks daily for a week. There are very many reasons why I use this method, and they all contribute to the gains we are trying to achieve. Super slow walking encourages use of all limbs to the best of their ability. Abby has already been able to walk multiple times daily, super slowly, for five and ten minute sessions, having built up slowly. Using the same exercise protocol for a week allows more time for the body to adjust to the work load, and it should go well, because these are introductory workouts, to build a base.

For the week following the twice daily 15 min walks, please walk her 2×20 minutes in the same manner, and only if the 15 minute walks are completed well for a week. She should be able to complete these walks without dragging a hind limb and without sagging or falling down. That’s because we spent time building the base. Otherwise, she needs to return to 10 minute walks and do them multiple times daily to ensure success. I am not wanting complete fatigue and maxing ability at this point; I am after building successful progress, which I believe her body will adapt to and accomplish.

I really would like her to wear two supportive hard braces during these walks, and I realize you have only one. She hyper-extends both her tarsal joints, and in order to use her hind legs properly and to subsequently use the muscles better/properly, the supportive brace that prevents hyper-extension while she is doing her slow drills would be additionally beneficial. Use the one you have on her R hind, since that leg has the most deficits and is the weakest. She hyper-extends because of nerve weakness and deficits in this case, and that has been a problem since I began giving you instruction for her over a year ago.

After the week of 2×20 min slow, relatively flat walks, please add in cavalettis, obstacles, to improve her proprioception. This may be accomplished in many ways and several locations around your environment. I have photos on my Facebook rehab page that depict several home-based cavaletti designs. Please be sure to read the descriptions below the pictures, because not every type of cavaletti is for every pet 🙂

Abby needs to do the cavalettis every other day and during one of the walk workout times. You should warm her up walking for 5 minutes then do obstacle repeats for 10-15 minutes. I suggest you use about 5 items in a row, spaced about half an Abby-length apart, and between 4-6 inches high for now. If we could get the old cat to do the work, I’m pretty sure we can get Abby to do it! If she is too stubborn for you, I will be glad to take a rehab session and work with you and her on this drill.

After a week of this drill, keep doing it as prescribed, and add in hill repeats every third day as one of her twice-daily workouts. I suggest walking out the front door, around to the back yard, and then up and down the hill on the far side of the house for 10-15 minutes, very slowly. I was able to get her to do this work this past summer when I came for rehab checks.

During the hill phase, it may be more beneficial for Abby to receive laser therapy on the hill work days. This should have the effect of stimulating nerves and cellular process and often improves work ability in the older and neuro-challenged animals. In her condition, I see reason to have twice-weekly laser sessions for at least a month-I’ve had good outcomes from doing this with similar cases.

I think it would be great if you were able to just start where I suggest, as if we were beginning from scratch, and let’s see the progress that comes from scripted protocol and collaborative effort. She won’t improve from this point if she keeps doing the same walks and leads the same life she has been leading for the past many months…the body stagnates, and the same happens for humans as well. Our brains aim toward conservation while our bodies are able to do more. I believe, based on my experience that is also based on years of research, that we will see strength and muscle gains if you start here again. I suggest we review in one month after these exercises have been completed. I will then revise the protocol and change the challenges.

Thanks!

Blessings-

Deborah January, 2013

Degenerative Myelopathy and Neurological Conditions

Question from the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management, 2012:

“Does anyone have any recommendations regarding treatments for a 14 year old Husky with Degenerative Myelopathy? So far, the only thought I have is a cart. Also, my understanding is these animals are not in significant pain – is this true? Thanks for any info.”

From: A Veterinarian in the U.S.A.

RehabDeb Response:

Hi!
I apologize for taking so long to reply. I have a 30-yr. background in human sport science and nutrition, worked two years in a veterinary specialty hospital designing and building the rehab dept., and since 2007 have had a mobile practice wherein I serve a huge number of “mystery-ortho-neuro” cases, many of which are presumed to be D.M. (Degenerative Myelopathy) (or, as of 11/2014, may have been tested using protocol at Missouri).

The functional rehabilitation protocol I have developed over time, and which has been successful at improving function to varying, yet notable, degrees is derived predominately from my experience in sport science program design coupled with principles of neuroscience. A body at rest stays at rest and only changes with dynamic interference…
(original RehabDeb quote :))

I DO agree that while D.M. may not produce pain in and of itself, it is highly likely that an animal with any neuro condition has self-induced pain by nature of the fact that they are compensating, stressing tissues, and possibly pinching nerves, akin to when our sciatica or sub-scapular, etc…get impinged and cause us pain.

Pain management discussion aside, for my own patients I introduce a system of simple, vibration-based, massage with a less-than-ten-dollars Homedics unit (https://rehabdeb.com/pet-massage/), Low-Level Laser Therapy (MUCH research exists regarding nerve conduction, regeneration, re-invigoration), and a plan of return to whatever level of function is possible via primarily-human-induced and animal-activated movement exercises, retraining brain-to-limb neural pathways and encouraging focus on movement and function. I prefer to use dry land and gravity, and I work with clients on methods to help them get this work done. Strength and endurance/conditioning drills I propose, depending on each animals status, are best

I begin with laser twice a week for a month and review exercise protocol that the owner is charged with doing if they are capable and which I do if the owner prefers. I use a front harness designed for riding in the car that has fleece and the best stitching I have found and only costs $30 shipped from Petsmart (no longer available-2014). This is the Travelin’ Dog harness. I turn it around, and it is “perfect” for hind end support (legs through arm holes, tail through neck hole) while relieving owner back stress, if used properly. It is much better designed for the body than the blue neoprene sling or a belly towel, less pressure on the abdomen than a belly sling, and less problematic than a Bottoms-Up sling. No one pays me to promote these items; I have just found that they are simply the best and inexpensive, and in my years of experience I deem that they work better than a lot of what is out there. I have pics around this blog of neuro dogs wearing these harnesses.

There are many more things that may be done, however getting the owner started on helping the animal around the home in a manner that hurts neither owner nor animal, and in a manner that is most productive time-wise, is one of the major components of my mobile practice. I tend to not involve owners in activities that, again, would potentially cause more harm than good or waste more time than be productive. This list includes ROM, balance balls, and balance boards, among other not-as-productive work that should be performed.

I also utilize a brand of boots with excellent traction, usually sometime along the way but not usually right away. Depending on function-ability I will introduce the boots when I believe they will not encumber the pet and will be more help than hindrance. The right boots always seem to encourage hind limb use when there already is function and they give stability in the home on tile and wood floors. I also often have pet owners stop using boots if they have begun using them before the pet is functionally ready.

On several elderly canine patients I have also used Epsom salts baths to great benefit.  Owners HAVE to ensure they rinse off all the salt residue after the bath, otherwise if the dog licks it, which they usually will, diarrhea will likely ensue.

These are some of the basics, and I will be glad to discuss the topic further if you’d contact me.

Blessings-

Deborah Carroll

 

After Surgery for Torn Knee Ligament (TPLO, TTA, CBLO, Lateral Suture) (CCL ACL Tear or Rupture)

Guidelines for Home Rehabilitation of Your Dog: After Surgery for Torn Knee Ligament: The First Four Weeks, Basic Edition

Preface to the Book of Instructions for Rehab After Surgery for Dog Torn Knee Ligament:

“Some of the information contained in this volume has been published previously by me on my websites beginning in January, 2007. Until this particular current publication, I have had available on my various sites (and on some sites that co-opted my material) a general outline for the first four weeks of post-surgical or post-injury rehab because the demand for this information has been so great.

The updated content of this volume is not available on any of my sites, nor has the full content been previously available, and most of the definitive information regarding exercise protocol that is contained in this volume has been removed from my websites and personal social media pages as of this publication.

When I first began publishing a simple home-based plan to the internet it was only a four-week, progressive walking exercise plan, useful for a variety of rehab situations. An expanded version of that is what is contained in this booklet.

What has happened though over time is that I have encountered many situations wherein people have interpreted these basic instructions in contrary ways, often omitting bits they thought they could and often in a way that has been detrimental to the pet.

Therefore, what this booklet also contains is a more thorough explanation of how to enact the plan well …and enact it simply. There is no “bullet point” version, because bullet points will not describe the details of functional rehab so that the animal receives more benefit while receiving less harm or discomfort.

As it is, I continually want to add to or modify bits of this edition, and I have to stop somewhere! This is the basic edition, the closest you may come to bullet points outside of my professional website.  Thank you, on behalf of your pet, for taking this time to learn more about the healing methods available for them.”

Blessings-

Rehabdeb

Reviewed July, 2019

Instead of Surgery for Torn Knee Ligament in Dogs

Guidelines for Home Rehabilitation of Your Dog: Instead of Surgery for Torn Knee Ligament: The First Four Weeks, Basic Edition (Volume 1)

Here is the link to the Amazon.com site for my booklet of instructions for you to follow after a diagnosis of torn CCL (cranial cruciate ligament, like ACL in people, in the knee) in your dog. Follow these guidelines whether you have decided not to pursue surgery for your dog or you are doing some rehab prior to surgery, “pre-hab”.

These instructions cover four weeks from when you begin to tackle the lameness and injury issues…regardless of when the injury occurred; I sometimes get to work with a dog that has been lame for a year or more after injury, so go by functional rehab time and not necessarily time from injury.

My books should also be available on worldwide Amazon sites, as well as other distribution sites, like Barnes & Noble.

On all other Amazon sites around the world, and on other distribution sites, please search this title and ISBN:

Guidelines for Home Rehabilitation of Your Dog: Instead of Surgery for Torn Knee Ligament: The First Four Weeks, Basic Edition

  • ISBN-13: 978-0615900476

Thank you, and here’s an excerpt!

Preface

Some of the information contained in this volume has been published previously by me on my websites beginning in January, 2007. Until this particular current publication, I have had available on my various sites (and on some sites that co-opted the material) a general outline for the first four weeks of post-surgical or post-injury rehab because the demand for this information has been so great.

The updated content of this volume is not available on any of my sites, nor has the full content been previously available, and most of the definitive information regarding exercise protocol that is contained in this volume has been removed from my websites and personal social media pages as of this publication.

When I first began publishing a simple home-based plan to the internet, it was only a four-week, progressive walking exercise plan, useful for a variety of rehab situations. A version of that is what is contained in this booklet. What has happened though over time is that I have encountered many situations wherein people have interpreted these basic instructions in contrary ways, often omitting bits they thought they could while still hoping for success and often in a way that has been detrimental to the pet.

Therefore, what this booklet also contains is a more thorough explanation of how to enact the plan well …and enact it simply. There is no “bullet point” version, because bullet points will not describe the details of functional rehab so that the animal receives more benefit while receiving less harm or discomfort. As it is, I continually want to add to or modify bits of this edition, and I have to stop somewhere!

This is the basic edition, the closest you may come to bullet points outside of my professional website.

There is also an expanded edition, which contains more in-depth looks at potential pitfalls and additional remedies, along with greater explanation as to why I believe some therapies are better than others, especially for wellness and healing complementary to a home environment.

Thank you, on behalf of your pet, for taking this time to learn more about the healing methods available for them.

Thanks!

Blessings-