Feedback, Reviews, and Testimonials –

Welcome!

Since you got to this page, you are probably hoping to find out more about other’s experiences with these rehabilitation programs. I have three different areas of feedback for you to discover. Click on the bold purple headers below and that will take you to that page of feedback.

Q&A Category –

You probably have this category figured out!

cat with inquisitive look about feedback reviews animal rehabilitation

It’s a collection of posts made from questions people have asked of me and my answers to them at the time. I have taken time to edit a few answers if my perspective has changed over time or if I think I need to make the information more clear.

I’ve got hundreds more questions on file that I have answered that I might get to make into posts, so stay tuned! Probably easier if you subscribe to this website. If you do, then you’ll receive email notice when I make new posts.

Reviews –

This page directs you to both veterinarian reviews and client reviews of my booklets and programs. I have copied most of the reviews from other business places on the web, such as Amazon. I really need and want to edit my booklets to add more info and photos and such, so, stay tuned, again.

In some cases, veterinarians wrote emails to me when they read my booklet(s) for the first time, and I copied some of the mail into posts for you to read as reviews.

Testimonials –

This  section has posts I made out of people’s feedback about the programs after they worked on rehab as I directed. In these posts clients tell how this rehab worked for their pet(s).

Social Media –

I completely deleted all of my Facebook pages and profiles in November, 2016, but I did save my files. I also deleted Twitter at the same time, but I have since begun a new Twit account. Once in a while I make a post based on feedback I received on Facebook or my old Twitter. The Twit changed in the time I was off of it, and I don’t have the same engagement type as I used to have, so there’s not a lot on there as of May, 2018. Feel free to engage me on the Twit.

Anyway, you get the idea. My other sm accounts are represented by words or badges in the sidebar or footer of this site. I aim for reciprocal connections.

I am my own social media person, and that takes a backseat to seeing patients, communicating with clients, and improving this website. There is already plenty of feedback for you to read on here, though, so I hope I’ve hit your topic of concern in these web pages.

Want to Comment?

I turned off comments on this site for a long time because I couldn’t keep up with answering people’s questions in what I thought was a timely manner. One of my former WordPress themes even stopped telling me I had comments when people posted them on the site.  I have been on the road a lot and was not able to check the site very often. Sometimes people’s questions went unanswered. Not good, imho.

I have comments after most posts turned on now. If you have feedback about this program or a post, you may write that as a comment or contact me with questions using the form on this page.

I have also been working hard on upgrading this site for you. I turned comments on again because I have easily covered info about the most frequent pet rehab questions searched on the web and on this site. I’m hoping people will read and search the site for the basics before asking me in a comment or contact form 🙂

I’m Desperate!

Please be aware that if you have a pet emergency, you really need to contact your veterinarian, a veterinary emergency clinic, or a 2nd opinion veterinarian if need be. 

Also, sometimes people do not think they are getting answers they need or want from their veterinarian. I do a lot of patient advocacy and navigation in human medicine and veterinary medicine, and I am a big fan of getting a 2nd (or 3rd or +) opinion on some issues.

People ask very many questions of me in comments and via contact forms about topics I have already covered on this site. Please search and read a lot of the info on this site so that you hopefully have your questions answered more quickly than you will waiting for me.

AND, if you read my basic post-injury or post-surgery information, you will know more details that will save you time if we later get together about your pet!

I am open to working with clients in paid consults from all around the world. I work in person and via phone for consults at this time.  You may find out more about my practice by looking at the info on the pages in the first drop-down menu under my main site banner.

Happy Reading, and Happy May Day –

Deborah

First Published March 9, 2017. Updated May 1, 2018

Physical Therapy as Effective as Surgery for Torn Meniscus and Arthritis of the Knee, (Human) Study Suggests

Just One of Many Studies Published on This Topic-

My programs for conservative (no surgery) treatment are clinically and anecdotally successful. So, this means that clients and veterinarians do the work and get good results.

Physical Therapy as Effective as Surgery for Torn Meniscus and Arthritis of the Knee, (Human) Study Suggests –

“Surgery may not always be the best first course of action.

A physical therapist, in many cases, can help patients avoid the often unnecessary risks and expenses of surgery. To reinforce that, this study should help change practice in the management of symptomatic meniscal tears in patients with knee osteoarthritis.” Mar. 21, 2013 — A New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) study showing that physical therapy is just as effective as surgery in patients with meniscal tears and arthritis of the knee should encourage many health care providers to reconsider their practices in the management of this common injury, according to the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA).

The study, published March 19, showed no significant differences in functional improvement after 6 months between patients who underwent surgery with postoperative physical therapy and those who received standardized physical therapy alone.

“This study demonstrates what physical therapists have long known,” explained APTA President Paul A. Rockar Jr, PT, DPT, MS. “Surgery may not always be the best first course of action. A physical therapist, in many cases, can help patients avoid the often unnecessary risks and expenses of surgery. This study should help change practice in the management of symptomatic meniscal tears in patients with knee osteoarthritis.”

According to lead physical therapist for the trial and American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) member Clare Safran-Norton, PT, PhD, OCS, “our findings suggest that a course of physical therapy in this patient population may be a good first choice since there were no group differences at 6 months and 12 months in this trial.

These findings should help surgeons, physicians, physical therapists, and patients in decision-making regarding their treatment options.”

Researchers at 7 major universities and orthopedic surgery centers around the country studied 351 patients aged 45 years or older who had a meniscal tear and mild-to-moderate osteoarthritis of the knee. Patients were randomly assigned to groups who received either surgery and postoperative physical therapy or standardized physical therapy. Within 6-12 months, patients who had physical therapy alone showed similar improvement in functional status and pain as those who had undergone arthroscopic partial meniscectomy surgery. Furthermore, patients who were given standardized physical therapy — individualized treatment and a progressive home exercise program — had the option of “crossing over” to surgery if substantial improvements were not achieved. In this situation, thirty percent of patients crossed over to surgery during the first 6 months. At 12 months these patients reported similar outcomes as those who initially had surgery. Seventy percent of patients remained with standardized physical therapy.

According to an accompanying editorial in NEJM,”millions of people are being exposed to potential risks associated with a treatment [surgery] that may or may not offer specific benefit, and the costs are substantial.” Physical therapist and APTA member Mary Ann Wilmarth, PT, DPT, MS, OCS, MTC, Cert MDT, chief of physical therapy at Harvard University, said, “Physical therapists are experts in improving mobility and restoring motion. The individualized treatment approach is very important in the early phases of rehabilitation in order to achieve desired functional outcomes and avoid setbacks or complications.”

Story Source:

The above story is reprinted from materials provided by American Physical Therapy Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.

Journal Reference:
Jeffrey N. Katz, Robert H. Brophy, Christine E. Chaisson, Leigh de Chaves, Brian J. Cole, Diane L. Dahm, Laurel A. Donnell-Fink, Ali Guermazi, Amanda K. Haas, Morgan H. Jones, Bruce A. Levy, Lisa A. Mandl, Scott D. Martin, Robert G. Marx, Anthony Miniaci, Matthew J. Matava, Joseph Palmisano, Emily K. Reinke, Brian E. Richardson, Benjamin N. Rome, Clare E. Safran-Norton, Debra J. Skoniecki, Daniel H. Solomon, Matthew V. Smith, Kurt P. Spindler, Michael J. Stuart, John Wright, Rick W. Wright, Elena Losina. Surgery versus Physical Therapy for a Meniscal Tear and Osteoarthritis. New England Journal of Medicine, 2013; : 130318220107009 DOI:10.1056/NEJMoa1301408

Veterinarian Comments and Reviews

You may find more positive veterinarian comments and reviews around the web. Below are a couple I have copied from various web locations –

“We are so grateful for the expertise and compassion you provide the central/south Texas community!”
Mission Veterinary Specialists, San Antonio, TX

“Once again, thanks for engaging the veterinary industry and client owners with your work and experience. I enjoy your enthusiasm and passion for the area.”
DVM, ACVS (American College of Veterinary Surgeons), South Texas

“Thanks so much, Deborah! The book is impressive. Maybe you should leave a copy at (some shelters) since they put so many cruciate dogs on the euthanasia list…Great work and thank you!”
DVM, Austin, TX

“Read your book. Excellent job. Now at ACVS they are all for non surgical acl (rehab)…Good job!”
DVM, Austin, TX

book cover of my non-surgical recovery booklet

“Finished reading “instead of surgery” kindle booklet. Bueno! Great discussion on importance of pain control, in particular. ”
DVM, Austin, TX

“Hi Deborah! I read your book the night I got it. I really like it and have already recommended it to a client last week. I hope she bought it. I will write a review for amazon for you, too. I hope you are really successful in this. I know how hard you work!”
DVM, Kerrville, TX

“Once again, thanks for engaging the veterinary industry and client owners with your work and experience. I enjoy your enthusiasm and passion for the area.”
DVM, ACVS, South Texas

“Great plan outline! I’ve come to think that using the water treadmill is (overrated), and it’s nice to finally have a definitive plan to get clients on the road to recovery.
DVM, ACVS, Austin, TX

“Just wanted you to know I read and appreciated the CCL rehab book, I will likely keep a few in the clinic.”
DVM, Austin, TX

“Bought one of your books last week. Its great!”
Megan Kelly BVSc DIPVET CCRP Holistic Veterinary Surgeon, Cape Town, South Africa

Please see client reviews and testimonials by clicking on either ^^ word in bold color ^^ 🙂

Thanks! Rehabdeb

(Updated February 10, 2018)

Books for After Surgery: Functional Recovery and Rehabilitation

Has your pet had surgery? Do you need a rehabilitation plan to follow at home?

Then take a moment to look over this site, follow the instructions on the surgery page, and stay calm and thoughtful about your work with your pet.

This book is the program to follow to begin recovery after most orthopedic or neurological surgeries.

Rehabilitation after surgery for torn knee ligament:

Click on THIS LINK, and you should be directed to Amazon in your country, unless you live in these countries – Australia, Brasil, India, Mexico, Nederland , in which case you should click on the name of your country ^^ to be taken to the book.

(available on Kindle and in paperback, and you may order the paperback through any bookseller by using the ISBN 978-0615905358)

Some Reviews About the Books…

(click ^^)

 

Blue Heeler Recovers From Torn Knee Ligament Without Surgery-

Sputnik Takes A Break From Trails in Colorado-

“I’ve been a client of Rehab and Conditioning since last November (2014).

My 9/10 year old heeler had/has a knee injury. In lieu of surgery, I decided to seek out a specialist to help and educate me on my dog’s injury and rehab plan.

Deborah is great! She’s smart and knowledgeable. She listens. She helps me to learn more so that I know how to work with my dog and gives me options for his recovery plans/schedules. Specifically, she works with my schedule – both with how to do exercises and also for scheduling meetings to review progress. She is even available for phone and email consults – where I can send her videos of progress and get her feedback.

I would recommend to any owner who is working with an animal who has an injury to seek out Deborah. She’s wonderful and if you follow her advice and her program, I have total confidence in saying that she will be so helpful to you and your pet.

Thank you Deborah. I have so much gratitude for your help, your patience, your knowledge, all of your support during this journey in my boy’s life!”

Renee S. Austin, TX

(Last I checked, 2017, Sputnik continues to do well and runs amok on trails in Colorado–Rehabdeb)