Blue Heeler Recovers From Torn Knee Ligament Without Surgery-

Sputnik Takes A Break From Trails in Colorado-

“I’ve been a client of Rehab and Conditioning since last November (2014).

My 9/10 year old heeler had/has a knee injury. In lieu of surgery, I decided to seek out a specialist to help and educate me on my dog’s injury and rehab plan.

Deborah is great! She’s smart and knowledgeable. She listens. She helps me to learn more so that I know how to work with my dog and gives me options for his recovery plans/schedules. Specifically, she works with my schedule – both with how to do exercises and also for scheduling meetings to review progress. She is even available for phone and email consults – where I can send her videos of progress and get her feedback.

I would recommend to any owner who is working with an animal who has an injury to seek out Deborah. She’s wonderful and if you follow her advice and her program, I have total confidence in saying that she will be so helpful to you and your pet.

Thank you Deborah. I have so much gratitude for your help, your patience, your knowledge, all of your support during this journey in my boy’s life!”

Renee S. Austin, TX

(Last I checked, 2017, Sputnik continues to do well and runs amok on trails in Colorado–Rehabdeb)

Links to Books and Best Boots for Traction

Hey!

I finally finished adding the links for my books on the first four weeks of recovery post-op and post-injury on this page:

Books!

And you will find links to purchase the booklets from most Amazon platforms around the world. I include Amazon links because the booklets are available on Kindle, and I offer some promotions on both Kindle and paperback versions that are only available on Amazon.
You may purchase the books through any bookseller by asking for them using the ISBN. You may find all the info you need to order from another bookseller by clicking through to the Amazon link and copying what your bookseller requires from the details below the book.

I do not currently offer the booklets in a language other than English, however I hope to translate into Spanish, French, German, and Italian in the near future as well as add other translations too!

I continue to work on editing the new version of the booklets, so clinics and rescues and shelters may still take advantage of the offer I have had in place for many years. You may easily use this page to order at a discount for clinics, rescues, and shelters:

Ordering for clinics, shelters, and rescue organizations!

I also just finished locating the boots and shoes I use to help pets with neurological problems to gain traction and stability (plus for hot pavement, ice, snow, jagged streets and terrain…) on many Amazon platforms around the world, including the USA, so I posted the links here:

Boots & Shoes for Traction + Instructions

I have included a lot of instruction and helpful hints from my 12+ years of working with different boots, shoes, socks, and more to gain traction for pets on this page and even more instructions are in a separate post linked from the page in the link just above this paragraph. I have a lot more items to post about that will help around the home, besides boots, shoes, etc…but this is what I have finished now, and I didn’t want to wait to put this info right in front of you.

Thank you-

Blessings-

Rehabdeb

2/22/17

Elderly Sheepdog With Neurological Problems – Homework Review

Here is the short write-up of my recommendations/reminders for Abby’s functional rehab and the process I believe will improve her neuro-muscular capabilities and strength.

To Abby’s Caretakers:

Some of this will be stuff I’ve mentioned several times over the course of working with Abby, however it bears review, and most of the time, when I re-evaluate a program, often we need to go back closer to a beginning point and press forward methodically in order to achieve expected gains. As always, I am available to do this work and especially if you need assistance because it is hard on your own body or even just to make sure it gets done so that Abby may recover well! 🙂

I can’t emphasize enough how beneficial the vibrational massage is, even if you do it every other day instead of every day for now. For a refresher, please watch the 10 minute video here:

https://rehabdeb.com/pet-massage/

And do it as best possible without cutting corners. You will get the best outcome if you follow the video instructions, and I’d really like it done daily to better encourage healing on several levels. Pertinent questions are also covered in the video, as well as methodology and benefits. Make sure you change out the batteries as soon as they seem dull, because the best benefit from this massage is realized from the vibration, which stimulates circulation, lessens tension, and potentially improves nerve conduction. I recommend, for now, doing the massage at the end of the day, at bedtime or thereabouts.

For the next week, please walk Abby twice daily, super slowly and consistently, without stopping, for 15 minutes. I chose 15 minutes because you said she has already accomplished doing 10 min walks for a week, 3-4 times per day. Before that, she laid a foundation with 3-4 five minute walks daily for a week. There are very many reasons why I use this method, and they all contribute to the gains we are trying to achieve. Super slow walking encourages use of all limbs to the best of their ability. Abby has already been able to walk multiple times daily, super slowly, for five and ten minute sessions, having built up slowly. Using the same exercise protocol for a week allows more time for the body to adjust to the work load, and it should go well, because these are introductory workouts, to build a base.

For the week following the twice daily 15 min walks, please walk her 2×20 minutes in the same manner, and only if the 15 minute walks are completed well for a week. She should be able to complete these walks without dragging a hind limb and without sagging or falling down. That’s because we spent time building the base. Otherwise, she needs to return to 10 minute walks and do them multiple times daily to ensure success. I am not wanting complete fatigue and maxing ability at this point; I am after building successful progress, which I believe her body will adapt to and accomplish.

I really would like her to wear two supportive hard braces during these walks, and I realize you have only one. She hyper-extends both her tarsal joints, and in order to use her hind legs properly and to subsequently use the muscles better/properly, the supportive brace that prevents hyper-extension while she is doing her slow drills would be additionally beneficial. Use the one you have on her R hind, since that leg has the most deficits and is the weakest. She hyper-extends because of nerve weakness and deficits in this case, and that has been a problem since I began giving you instruction for her over a year ago.

After the week of 2×20 min slow, relatively flat walks, please add in cavalettis, obstacles, to improve her proprioception. This may be accomplished in many ways and several locations around your environment. I have photos on my Facebook rehab page that depict several home-based cavaletti designs. Please be sure to read the descriptions below the pictures, because not every type of cavaletti is for every pet 🙂

Abby needs to do the cavalettis every other day and during one of the walk workout times. You should warm her up walking for 5 minutes then do obstacle repeats for 10-15 minutes. I suggest you use about 5 items in a row, spaced about half an Abby-length apart, and between 4-6 inches high for now. If we could get the old cat to do the work, I’m pretty sure we can get Abby to do it! If she is too stubborn for you, I will be glad to take a rehab session and work with you and her on this drill.

After a week of this drill, keep doing it as prescribed, and add in hill repeats every third day as one of her twice-daily workouts. I suggest walking out the front door, around to the back yard, and then up and down the hill on the far side of the house for 10-15 minutes, very slowly. I was able to get her to do this work this past summer when I came for rehab checks.

During the hill phase, it may be more beneficial for Abby to receive laser therapy on the hill work days. This should have the effect of stimulating nerves and cellular process and often improves work ability in the older and neuro-challenged animals. In her condition, I see reason to have twice-weekly laser sessions for at least a month-I’ve had good outcomes from doing this with similar cases.

I think it would be great if you were able to just start where I suggest, as if we were beginning from scratch, and let’s see the progress that comes from scripted protocol and collaborative effort. She won’t improve from this point if she keeps doing the same walks and leads the same life she has been leading for the past many months…the body stagnates, and the same happens for humans as well. Our brains aim toward conservation while our bodies are able to do more. I believe, based on my experience that is also based on years of research, that we will see strength and muscle gains if you start here again. I suggest we review in one month after these exercises have been completed. I will then revise the protocol and change the challenges.

Thanks!

Blessings-

Deborah January, 2013

Degenerative Myelopathy and Neurological Conditions

Question from the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management, 2012:

“Does anyone have any recommendations regarding treatments for a 14 year old Husky with Degenerative Myelopathy? So far, the only thought I have is a cart. Also, my understanding is these animals are not in significant pain – is this true? Thanks for any info.”

From: A Veterinarian in the U.S.A.

RehabDeb Response:

Hi!
I apologize for taking so long to reply. I have a 30-yr. background in human sport science and nutrition, worked two years in a veterinary specialty hospital designing and building the rehab dept., and since 2007 have had a mobile practice wherein I serve a huge number of “mystery-ortho-neuro” cases, many of which are presumed to be D.M. (Degenerative Myelopathy) (or, as of 11/2014, may have been tested using protocol at Missouri).

The functional rehabilitation protocol I have developed over time, and which has been successful at improving function to varying, yet notable, degrees is derived predominately from my experience in sport science program design coupled with principles of neuroscience. A body at rest stays at rest and only changes with dynamic interference…
(original RehabDeb quote :))

I DO agree that while D.M. may not produce pain in and of itself, it is highly likely that an animal with any neuro condition has self-induced pain by nature of the fact that they are compensating, stressing tissues, and possibly pinching nerves, akin to when our sciatica or sub-scapular, etc…get impinged and cause us pain.

Pain management discussion aside, for my own patients I introduce a system of simple, vibration-based, massage with a less-than-ten-dollars Homedics unit (https://rehabdeb.com/pet-massage/), Low-Level Laser Therapy (MUCH research exists regarding nerve conduction, regeneration, re-invigoration), and a plan of return to whatever level of function is possible via primarily-human-induced and animal-activated movement exercises, retraining brain-to-limb neural pathways and encouraging focus on movement and function. I prefer to use dry land and gravity, and I work with clients on methods to help them get this work done. Strength and endurance/conditioning drills I propose, depending on each animals status, are best

I begin with laser twice a week for a month and review exercise protocol that the owner is charged with doing if they are capable and which I do if the owner prefers. I use a front harness designed for riding in the car that has fleece and the best stitching I have found and only costs $30 shipped from Petsmart (no longer available-2014). This is the Travelin’ Dog harness. I turn it around, and it is “perfect” for hind end support (legs through arm holes, tail through neck hole) while relieving owner back stress, if used properly. It is much better designed for the body than the blue neoprene sling or a belly towel, less pressure on the abdomen than a belly sling, and less problematic than a Bottoms-Up sling. No one pays me to promote these items; I have just found that they are simply the best and inexpensive, and in my years of experience I deem that they work better than a lot of what is out there. I have pics around this blog of neuro dogs wearing these harnesses.

There are many more things that may be done, however getting the owner started on helping the animal around the home in a manner that hurts neither owner nor animal, and in a manner that is most productive time-wise, is one of the major components of my mobile practice. I tend to not involve owners in activities that, again, would potentially cause more harm than good or waste more time than be productive. This list includes ROM, balance balls, and balance boards, among other not-as-productive work that should be performed.

I also utilize a brand of boots with excellent traction, usually sometime along the way but not usually right away. Depending on function-ability I will introduce the boots when I believe they will not encumber the pet and will be more help than hindrance. The right boots always seem to encourage hind limb use when there already is function and they give stability in the home on tile and wood floors. I also often have pet owners stop using boots if they have begun using them before the pet is functionally ready.

On several elderly canine patients I have also used Epsom salts baths to great benefit.  Owners HAVE to ensure they rinse off all the salt residue after the bath, otherwise if the dog licks it, which they usually will, diarrhea will likely ensue.

These are some of the basics, and I will be glad to discuss the topic further if you’d contact me.

Blessings-

Deborah Carroll

 

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