Oki the Rottweiler Does Great on This Rehab Plan After Tearing His Knee Ligament and Meniscus!

Oki Holds His Own and Plays Well After Recovery from Torn Knee Ligament

“My hound/shepherd mix (Oki) was diagnosed with a torn ACL. After a consult with a surgical vet, I wanted to see what other options were available for Oki. Post-surgical recovery carried a high risk of “catastrophic failure” of my dog’s back leg and seemed like an extremely painful and difficult trial to put my dog through. My vet recommended Deborah as an alternative.

After consulting with Deborah, we decided to try an alternative approach to surgery. She was realistic and said that he might still have to get surgery because of his size (90+lbs) but it was worth trying to heal the ACL through rehabilitation exercises, chiropractic care and restricted movement (no running, jumping).

(Note from Rehabdeb…I met Oki and Michelle in May, 2009. Since then I’ve seen hundreds of large dogs recovery extremely well without surgery for torn knee ligament, and I would never have the surgery again on one of my own dogs…no need)…

Deborah set up a detailed care plan for me (beginning here) and was always available when I had questions. We set up periodic appointments to monitor Oki’s progress and make adjustments to his rehab exercises.

It took about 6 months, but Oki’s ACL healed well and he never needed surgery or pain meds. He also thoroughly enjoyed his chiropractic adjustments. He was able to go back to almost all normal activities and avoided the pain and trauma of surgery.

Since then, Deborah has become my go to person whenever one of my dogs is injured. She offers practical and realistic advice, has great rapport with the dogs and I trust her opinion completely. Most importantly, Deborah is always thinking of the dog’s comfort and quality of life – allowing me to make informed decisions that maximize the benefit for my dogs.”

Michelle S. Forest Hills, NY

Goals of Therapeutic Exercise

Previously Published on Medscape

 

What should you expect from therapeutic exercise? (italicized bits are my own additions-rehabdeb)

Therapeutic exercise should…

  • Enable ambulation (or bring about improvements from baseline status)
  • Release contracted muscles, tendons, and fascia
  • Mobilize joints
  • Improve circulation
  • Improve respiratory capacity
  • Improve coordination
  • Reduce rigidity
  • Improve balance
  • Promote relaxation
  • Improve muscle strength and, if possible, achieve and maintain maximal voluntary contractile force (MVC)
  • Improve exercise performance and functional capacity (endurance)

The last 2 goals mirror an individual’s overall physical fitness, characterized by good muscle strength combined with good endurance.

No matter which types of exercise may be needed initially and are applied to remedy a patient’s specific condition, the final goal of rehabilitation is to achieve, whenever possible, an optimal level of physical fitness by the end of the treatment regimen.

Medscape, Feb., 2012

All of my rehabilitation programs produce the above results, I’m stoked to say!

Formerly paralyzed Sully the Great Dane walking around the block demonstrating benefits of therapeutic exercise
Formerly paralyzed Sully the Great Dane walking around the block.