Sully the Great Dane With Neurological Problems

“I highly recommend Deborah for any pet rehab. My 9-year-old Great Dane collapsed for some unknown reason and was paralyzed. Two vets told me he probably wouldn’t recover and I should consider putting him down. Fortunately one of the vets told me about Deborah and, being a Great Dane owner herself, she came to visit my big boy.

Silly Sully Great Dane with Paralysis

She started him on laser therapy and built the “Sully station” out of PVC pipe just for his personal rehab. Within a very short period of time he was able to get up with help and take short walks. He progressed to being able to get up on his own and walk around the house and eventually outside unaided.

Sully in Sully Station to do His Neurological Drills

Because of Deborah I was able to have my wonderful companion for an extra year-and-a-half. She cares about every pet she treats and equally cares about the people who love their companions. Deborah is a wonderful educator and knows how to think out of the box. She’ll always be a special person to me!”          Diane S., Austin, TX

Sully in the Middle of His Daily Walk After Recovery

Links to Books and Best Boots for Traction

Hey!

I finally finished adding the links for my books on the first four weeks of recovery post-op and post-injury on this page:

Books!

And you will find links to purchase the booklets from most Amazon platforms around the world. I include Amazon links because the booklets are available on Kindle, and I offer some promotions on both Kindle and paperback versions that are only available on Amazon.
You may purchase the books through any bookseller by asking for them using the ISBN. You may find all the info you need to order from another bookseller by clicking through to the Amazon link and copying what your bookseller requires from the details below the book.

I do not currently offer the booklets in a language other than English, however I hope to translate into Spanish, French, German, and Italian in the near future as well as add other translations too!

I continue to work on editing the new version of the booklets, so clinics and rescues and shelters may still take advantage of the offer I have had in place for many years. You may easily use this page to order at a discount for clinics, rescues, and shelters:

Ordering for clinics, shelters, and rescue organizations!

I also just finished locating the boots and shoes I use to help pets with neurological problems to gain traction and stability (plus for hot pavement, ice, snow, jagged streets and terrain…) on many Amazon platforms around the world, including the USA, so I posted the links here:

Boots & Shoes for Traction + Instructions

I have included a lot of instruction and helpful hints from my 12+ years of working with different boots, shoes, socks, and more to gain traction for pets on this page and even more instructions are in a separate post linked from the page in the link just above this paragraph. I have a lot more items to post about that will help around the home, besides boots, shoes, etc…but this is what I have finished now, and I didn’t want to wait to put this info right in front of you.

Thank you-

Blessings-

Rehabdeb

2/22/17

Neurological and Paralysis – German Shepherd FCE

FCE Rehab for Yiqqyir the Shepherd Mix

“Y” had an FCE (fibrocartilaginous embolism) and has regained almost “normal” function in her left hind leg while her right is dragging and lagging 🙂 This is our first meeting, and Y is doing much better than it sounded like she might be doing when we were exchanging emails! She was not knuckling (bending over her paw and dragging or walking on the top) during our visit when she was made to go very slowly. I began her on a basic endurance and foundation strength-building walking program. Some of our discussion is in the video, and hopefully it begins to answer some questions you may have.

Update: Y’s caretaker emailed this to me shortly after our visit:
“Have been working out with Yiqqiyr as directed. She is doing FABULOUSLY!”
“Friday after I went home from seeing you, we did a walk and two massage sessions. Saturday we walked 3×15 min and did 3 massage sessions. Sunday was the same. Monday I was off work at the office for the holiday, so we were able to keep the same schedule.”

By the way, my videographer has a dog that had similar problems after back surgery years ago, and he has done great! His rehab went well, family followed instructions, including restrictions, and years later he is going strong and able to play rugby with his kray-kray sister dog 🙂

There are MANY conditions that can lead to an animal dragging the hind feet, and the number one cause I see is protruding disks. If your pet is not paralyzed, you DO need to see a vet and work on getting a diagnosis. The treatments are different for the different causes of nerve damage. If your pet IS paralyzed, the sooner you get to the vet, the better. In my area complete lack of limb use gets you an appointment with a surgery specialist. Mild to moderate nerve issues may be dealt with using appropriate drugs and restrictions, depending on the diagnosis.

Blessings-